andreabedini / plutus-metatheory

Mechanised meta theory for Plutus Core (DEPRECATED - MOVED to plutus)

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This repository has MOVED

It has been ASSIMILATED into the main plutus repository where it lives in the metatheory folder.

This version will not be updated.

2 April 2019.

Archived material below.

plutus-metatheory

Mechanised meta theory for Plutus Core

Plutus Core is the language Plutus programs are compiled into. It is based on System F omega with iso-recursive types.

Meta theory is theory about the theory. It seeks to answer the questions of whether the language and its semantics are correct rather than whether a particular program is correct. To mechanize it is to get a proof assistant tool to check your proofs for you. This gives a much higher degree of assurance.

This repository contains a formalisation of Plutus Core in Agda. Agda is both a dependently typed functional programming language and a proof assistant. It is particularly suited to formalising programming languages.

Installation

The formalisation requires a pre-release of Agda 2.6.0 and, the latest version of the Agda standard library, and a version of ghc that is supported by Agda.

It also it contains a command line tool called plc-agda for executing plutus core programs. The command line tool is an Agda program that is compiled to Haskell, it uses Haskell libraries (such as bytestring) and also borrows the Plutus parser and pretty printer.

Building it requires the language-plutus-core Haskell library from here. After installing this (via cabal), plc-agda can then be built like this:

$ agda --compile --ghc-dont-call-ghc Main.lagda
$ cabal install

Status

The formalisation currently covers the full language of Plutus Core: System F omega with (deep) iso-recursive types, and builtin-types for sized integers and sized bytestrings. Progress and preservation have been shown to hold for the small-step semantics. An evaluator can be used to execute small examples in Agda and also compile them to Haskell.

The command line tool plc-agda does not include a typechecker. Instead it uses a separate extrinsically typed evaluator. It is future work to prove that this gives the same results as the intrinsically typed evaluator on well typed programs.

Structure

The formalisation is split into three sections. Firstly,

  1. Types.

Then, two different implementations of the term language:

  1. Terms indexed by syntactic types (declarative);
  2. Terms indexed by normal types (algorithmic).

Types

Types are defined in the Type module. They are intrinsically kinded so it is impossible to apply a type operator to arguments of the wrong kind.

The type module is further subdivided into submodules:

  1. Type.RenamingSubstitution contains the operations of renaming and substitution for types and their proofs of correctness. These are necessary to, for example, define the beta rule for types in the equational theory and reduction relation (described below).

  2. Type.Equality contains the beta-equational theory of types. This is essentially a specification for the computational behaviour of types.

  3. Type.Reduction contains the small step reduction relation, the progress/preservation results for types, and an evaluator for types. This result is not used later in the development but is in the spec.

  4. Type.BetaNormal contains beta normal forms for types as a separate syntax. Beta normal forms contain no beta-redexes and guaranteed not to compute any further.

  5. Type.BetaNBE contains a beta normaliser for types, it is defined in the style of "normalization-by-evaluation" (NBE) and is guaranteed to terminate. Further submodules define the correctness proofs for the normalizer and associated operations.

    1. Type.BetaNBE.Soundness contains a proof that normalizer preserves the meaning of the types. Formally it states that if we normalize a type then the resultant normal form is equal (in the equational theory) to the type we started with.

    2. Type.BetaNBE.Completeness contains a proof that the if we were to normalize two types that are equal in the equation theory then we will end up with identical normal forms.

    3. Type.BetaNBE.Stability contains a proof that normalization will preserve syntactic structure of terms already in normal form.

    4. Type.BetaNBE.RenamingSubsitution contains a version of substitution that works on normal forms and ensures that the result is in normal form. This works by embedding normal forms back into syntax, performing a syntactic substitution and then renormalizing. The file also contains a correctness proof for this version of substitution.

Note: Crucially, this development of NBE (and anything else in the formalisation for that matter) does not rely on any postulates (axioms). Despite the fact that we need to reason about functions in several places we do not require appealing to function extensionality which currently requires a postulate in Agda. In this formalisation the (object) type level programs and their proofs appear in (object) terms. Appealing to a postulate in type level proofs would stop term level programs computing.

Builtins

There are builtin types of integers and bytestrings. They are both sized: max/min values for integers and max length for bytestrings.

  1. Builtin.Constant.Type contains the enumeration of the type constants.
  2. Builtin.Constant.Term contains the enumeration of the sized term constants at the bottom.
  3. Builtin.Signature contains the list of builtin operations and their type signatures. In the specification this information is contained in the large builtin table.

The rest of the Builtin machinery: telescopes, and the semantics of builtins are contained in Declarative.Term.Reduction.

Terms indexed by syntactic types

This is the standard presentation of the typing rules that one may find in a text book. We can define the terms easily in this style but using them in further programs/proofs is complicated by the presence of a separate syntactic constructor for type conversion (type cast/coercion). The typing rules are not syntax directed which means it is not possible to directly write a typechecker for these rules as their is always a choice of rules to apply when building a derivation. Hence we refer to this version as declarative rather than algorithmic. In this formalisation where conversion is a constructor of the syntax not just a typing rule this also affects computation as we don't know how to process conversions when evaluating. In this version progress, and evaluation do not handle the conversion constructor. They fail if they encounter it. Nevertheless this is sufficient to handle examples which do not require computing the types before applying beta-reductions. Such as Church/Scott Numerals.

  1. The Declarative.Term module contains the definition of terms. This module has two further submodules:

    1. Declarative.Term.RenamingSubstitution contains the definitions of substitution for terms that is necessary to specify the beta-rules in the reduction relation. This definition and those it depends on, in turn, depend on the definitions and correctness proofs of the corresponding type level operations.

    2. Declarative.Term.Reduction This file contains the reduction relation for terms (also known as the small step operational semantics) and the progress proof. Preservation is inherent. Note: this version of progress doesn't handle type conversions in terms.

  2. Declarative.Evaluation contains the evaluator the terms. It takes a gas argument which is the number of steps of reduction that are allowed. It returns both a result and trace of reduction steps or out of gas. Note: this version of evaluation doesn't handle type conversions in terms.

  3. Declarative.Examples contains some examples of Church and Scott Numerals. Currently it is very memory intensive to type check this file and/or run examples.

Terms indexed by normal types

This version is able to handle type conversion by using the normalizer described above to ensure that types are always in normal form. This means that no conversion constructor is necessary as any two types which one could convert between are already in identical normal form. Here the typing rules are syntax directed and we don't have to deal with conversions in the syntax. This allows us to define progress, preservation, and evaluation for the full language of System F omega with iso-recursive types and sized integers and bytestrings.

  1. The Algorithmic.Term module contains the definition of terms. This module has two further submodules:

    1. Algorithmic.Term.RenamingSubstitution contains the definitions of substitution for terms that is necessary to specify the beta-rules in the reduction relation. This definition and those it depends on, in turn, depend on the definitions and correctness proofs of the corresponding type level operations. In this version this includes depeneding on the correctness proof of the beta normalizer for types.

    2. Algorithmic.Term.Reduction This file contains the reduction relation for terms (also known as the small step operational semantics) and the progress proof. Preservation is, again, inherent.

  2. Algorithmic.Evaluation contains the evaluator the terms. It takes a gas argument which is the number of steps of reduction that are allowed. It returns both a result and trace of reduction steps or out of gas.

  3. Algorithmic.Examples contains some examples of Church and Scott Numerals. Currently it is very memory intensive to type check this file and/or run examples.

We also need to show that the algorithmic version of the type system is sound and complete.

  1. Algorithmic.Soundness

Programmatically this corresponds to taking a term with normal type and converting it back to a term with a syntactic type. This introduces conversions into the term anywhere there a substitution occurs in a type.

  1. Algorithmic.Completeness

Programmatically this correponds to taking a term with a syntactic type that may contain conversions and normalising its type by collapsing all the conversions.

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Mechanised meta theory for Plutus Core (DEPRECATED - MOVED to plutus)

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